Professional Practice Briefing

Part of the assessment  for exposure  
20% of the grade for the module

Presentation
Submitted by 10th May on moodle, presented the week after in the show space.

(all information in the graphics section of exposure)

  • Afterlife is part of professional practice – what have I gained from the talks from people.
  • Exit strategy – planning for what you are going to do with education and what you are going to do next.  The school wants to see evidence of what im going to do next.

Degree show Catalogue – shows a piece of your work and information about it. This deadline is the 30th April.

Useful resources chapter – look at this.

Deliverables (in presentations)

  • 15 slides – 10 mins to deliver presentation
  • exit strategy.
  • CV
  • PDF Portfolio smaple pages
  • Website portfolio sample pages
  • Identities professional opportunities along with evidence
  • CSAD online catalogue submission
  • EDGE  – Ethical, Digital, Global, Entrepreneurial

Deliverables –

  • PDF portfolio, link to website
  • Learning journal

Afterlife: Zuzanna El Tanbouli – silky way magazine

5th February 2019

Silky Way magazine is a self published travel publication.

Why having a side project is important – started as the FMP in third year.
– Something to continue with after graduation.
– Freelance or other projects – push Instagram as it can bring great opportunities. Doing lots of networking, meeting lots of creatives, nice friends. Good opportunity to get feedback and support for projects and exposing them.
– Glug events, Plan B events

First job – not great
– opinions weren’t respected, they were taken away by senior designers or creative directors.

Its okay to have thinking time after a tough situation,.

How the creative industry was working at that time meant the role of junior designer was tough, no one listened or respected the ideas. But is necessary to pay rent.

Opened the blog – beyond silky way as the magazine is published yearly, this is more constant updating. 

Self promotion is important to kickstart things.

Collaboration with 31 The Store – future projects inbetween the shop and silky way – now working there as a visual merchandiser, in charge of window displays, social media, visual merchandise, reaching out to artists illustrators, designers asking to work together. It’s design in a different sort of way.

Personal projects with a lot of hard work behind them will allow people to see your passion. And this can help you get to places tou wouldn’t have with out it.

The design profession is ‘ageist’ higher up people think they

Ifyoucould job board on itsnicethat

It was interesting to hear experiences that werent all positive, it makes you think about the type of thing I want to do and the strains of being in a place that isn’t a good fit with you personally or in the way you like to work. It makes me a little worried about how I would deal with some of the experiences Zuzanna had experienced.

Criticality Research

Mary Beth Edelson – reimaging history with female privilege.
In these pieces of work the artists provides women with the privilege that was historically owned by men.
Its interesting to replace men in these pieces of art with women, because as a society you just expect to see men. It makes me think of what the women of the time would be doing as obviously they were not at the events. I think it also has the effect of saying if a man can a woman can, as in what is the difference? other than the biology of the body what is the difference? It could have been women in these images.

EBay – Doll Underwear
After thinking about where young girls create their identity I found that popular culture is one of the biggest influences in the way someones identity is formed. Considering this, I thought that for a young girl barbie has been an influencing factor over time. The intention of more contemporary iterations of the barbie doll is “Inpsiring girls since 1959” (https://barbie.mattel.com/shop#)
So from a google image search of ‘barbie doll’ I found a link to an eBay listing for “BARBIE DOLL’S CLOTHING SEXY LACE LINGERIE UNDERWEAR BRA KNICKERS BABY DOLL SET”

This got me thinking about the influence that toys have on the development of identities – obviously probably a parent wouldn’t buy thier children “sexy lace lingerie” sets for their dolls. However, it shows how the sexualisation of children has made it into popular culture and how the objects that inhabit children’s lives can influence them during their formative years.

Barbiemamuse
Similarly to the above this websites creator recreates famous or their favourite pieces of work in barbie form. some examples include:

This idea of replacing humans with dolls, even if its accidental, puts them as ‘perfect’ beings whos importance comes from their appearence.

Action Man: Battlefield Casualties 
A Veterans for peace film by Price James, looks at the consequences of war on the individual using the glorification of war that the action man toys rely on. The dolls draw attention to the PTSD epidemic that faces the world. The adverts created are hard hitting and tackle a very serious issue but do so with some humour as to not alienate the audience.

Criticality research on Advertising

What is empowerment? Its the idea of ‘providing’ autonomy and strength to marginalized people. The term was heavily used in the 80’s and 90’s feminism movements, often about women in third world countries – empowering them through giving them the opportunity to access education etc. However, the term became problematic when fourth wave feminism became about women judging other women for doing something, which is not really what feminism should be about.

Some argue that the term empowerment has become synonymous with self indulgence – the sex in the city idea that maxing out your credit card is an action of protest…this links to the idea that women have become self objectificating. Which is positively correlated with Facebook use.

Jean Kilbourne – The dangerous way ads see women. 

Killing us softly 
Kilbourne argues that advertisements sell more than just products – they sell ideas about culture and the world we live in. They work as a pressuring force of the ideal women – young, thin and beautiful and that anything other than this isn’t ‘attractive’ or acceptable.
I theme of dismembered female bodies alongside insulting copy emphasises the ‘importance’ of physical appearance and perfection. Advertisements use our imperfections to sell us things that will lessen the negative effects or distract people from our imperfections. Like this advert:



This objectification is seen mainly by the chopping up of female bodies, when it happens with mens bodies it doesn’t tend to be insulting to the person reading it. She argues there are less consequences for men when the objectification happens to them.

Throughout advertising the woman is placed as the submissive, vulnerable, infantalised object. This, especially the infantilisation of women is problematic in a society where child sexual abuse happens, these images of sexualised child/ adults nrmalise the sexualisation of children, especialy young girls. The issue lies in the cultures pornograohic attitude toward sex, and the ever increasing graphic nature of porn which trickles into popular culture like advertising, this includes extreme images of sexual violence. These normalise sexual violence and perpetuate the problem of domestic abuse. This normalisation of violence toward women is also spured on by the way women are reduced to ‘things’ or ‘objects’ which allows violence to happen as things or objects don’t have feelings or rights. The person is dehumanised and violence becomes inevitable.

Often the body parts women are reduced to are the provocative or mainstreamly attractive – breasts, bums and legs.

Madonna Badger
In various interview and talks Madonna Badger describes how her advertising agency actively steers away from the objectification of anyoens bodies. She talks about the subject vs. object, this is when the woman/ becomes a passive object used for the enjoyment of others not an active part of a sexual scenario. She suggests that in advertising men are afforded dignity and respect whereas women are objectified and infantilised, the increasing sexualisation of little girls. And when men are objectified they are done so in a way that makes them appear stronger and more powerful as aposed to passive and weak and open to exploitation.

Advertisements reinforce the idea that appearance is the most important trait a woman or girl has. The issues arise when sexual open-ness was taken by the mainstream media and turned into raunchiness.
One woman describes the way that its a womans choice to stand in the street naked, this choice does not give other people – mostly strangers – to touch her. Sexual openness or nudity isnt a form of consent nor should it be used to sell things like rice or hairspray or clothes.
Its is suggested that self sexualisation becomes what empowers us – but in my opinion is this this just objectifying yourself before others get the chance to do it to you? Advertisements teach both boys and girls, men and women that the way you look is more important than who you are.

Criticality: Idea Generation

I started to generate ideas based on some of the themes in my dissertation as well some of the things Theo talked about during todays lecture. The objectification of women is widespread in media and culture.

This is one of the main topics in my dissertation. But now I want to focus more on the idea that empowerment is a facade of sexual objectification.
This is something that interests me whilst I was doing my dissertation but I couldn’t explore it as fully as I wanted to due to the dissertation having a different main focus that wasn’t empowerment.

I though about what does a ‘powerful woman’ looks like or who is deemed a powerful woman.

Sexual objectification of women has been widespread in the music, fashion, advertising industry for decades and the age old phrase that ‘sex sells’. But now since the increased feminist movement this ‘objectification’ is being labelled as ’empowerment’ in a way that women are deemed to be taking ‘ownership’ of their bodies by displaying them out of their own agency. This has made the argument of objetification vs. empowerment. Does the context, the creator and inted audience of the image determine where it sits within the argument?

After speaking to Theo I have found that I just need to start researching into what images of women are out there and what they are used for and by who to try and understand the problem more fully, that way I can find critical a solution that will help draw attention to this problem. An example would be Hugh Hefner and the effect he has had on Western society and therefore the people who live within this society. Theo suggested looking at Jason Savalon’s work which explores the averages and the mean colours in wedding photos and centerfolds. This will help with understanding what has already been done to comment on images of women. I need to understand the territory and figure out a way I can point out what is wrong with it.

Criticality Introduction

Dissertation Design and Criticality

Diss design – an opportunity to show off editorial design to anyone who asks you to see your dissertation.

  • Create a piece of editorial design, grid structure and hierarchy. Deadline 10th May

Criticality
We decide the context, methods and deliverables/ outcomes.

All of these decisions must be justified – what is the nature of the problem and what is the most appropriate outcome – let the problem dictate the nature of the outcome not your subject practice. Need to be able to prove, in the execution of the project, a logical solution.

Pre-empt the questions that might be asked of the work, and embed this in the presentation of the work.

The conceptual underpinning of the work is more important than what it looks like.

Look at anything that is presented to you and look at it in a way that others haven’t before.

Anthony Dunne – critical design.

Small projects that draw attention to big problems. Drawing attention to hidden agendas.

Anthony Dunne 1999 ‘Hertzian Tales’ designing into this Hertzian space.

How you frame yourself can create different interpretations of what you are doing.

He affirmative model provides ‘solutions’ the critical model says there are alternatives.

Dan carlin camouflage

The critical deals with design for provoking debate – designed to make you think not to make you buy (affirmative).

The expression of ideas embodied in physical artifacts.

Zeitgeist

– the spirit of the time in which we live. Things that exemplify the time. 

  • Re Dubhthaigh – design and the zeitgeist – the graphics of the time contributes and draws from the zeitgeist.

(Walker Evans, 1936 – photography)
(Sherry Levine, 1979 – photographs of Evans work – taking about perfect reproduction and what this means for the value of the original – does it increase or decrease) anything can be reproduced
(Mandiberg, 2001 – scanned the photos of the originals – anyone could download and edit them.) anything can be modified

They build on the ideas of the previous zeitgeist.

Artwork that makes ideas visiable to the public that weren’t there.
Chapmen Bros, recreation of Goyas ‘great deeds against the dead’  as a physical artefact. Cake&Na=eaves recreation of that.
work that irreverent and disrespectful to the originals – be critical of them, draw attention to and undermine the romantic fallacy on which these things are build. Not always bad can be funny or humorous.

  • Kate Harrison (similar theme) how women used technology and clothing to denigrate appearance. Whale bone corsets.
  • Banksy – sunflowers, crude oils series.

Process intervention

Von Bismark – Image fulgurator – intervention to photographic process. Flash gun inside the camerea – which projects an image onto what the other camerea is photographing when their flash goes off.  So the final image is a mixture of the fulgurator flash and the image from the camera.

So through practice you can make an intervention into what people normally do, an intervention into the physical process that we do.

Graphics reinforces the affirmative model by sustaining it.

Reinforces models, like gender – toilet signs, dominant spread legs stance commanding assertion, woman chastity recessive. The genderification of costume is also important. Modes of behaviour and costume, radically simplistic and reductionist images of people.

As a designer your responsible for perpetuating certain ideologies. You can change and shift this in your work.  

(Buckminster filler – map of the earth, and designer of buildings of eden project)

*false empowerment of women through objectification*

Afterlife: Bwtic

Bwtic – Paul Thomas

Failure can be a beginning not an end.

Think about how people are going to receive the things you send them. PDF portfolio.

If you can join a studio after you graduate, it’s a good place to learn and develop as a designer. It gives you a place where you can make mistakes and learn from them.

Freelancing in studios, lets you work with lots of different people and different projects.

National Theatre Wales –

Produce site specific theatre. Applied to be the artist in residence, slowly started to work with them, building working relationships with clients so you work with them not just for them.

Working on the rebrand of the National Theatre Wales. Takes months of research, workshops, interviews – need to know what the brand is about.

Bwtic

Less talk – more listen

Less know – more learn

Less distance – more understanding

Less for – more with

Less ego – more empathy.

Compete with yourself and your previous work not just with others and what you have seen elsewhere.

Whilst freelancing you have to have confidence and be able to be on your toes and confident in your ideas. There seems to be more pressure whilst freelancing. This is why it might be better to start out in a studios. Higher pressure whilst freelancing. There is a lot of other distractions whist working freelance that you have to think about other than just the design work.

When contacting design companies

Remember they are very busy, people will try and get back to you. Be concise with your portfolio and what you send out to people, make it easy for them. Show interest in the company and the individual – I there any connections. Show what you can offer them – what you can bring to them.

Work experience – they help you get a feel for the studio culture. Ideal to try and get experience, without this enthusiasm and work ethic showing your willing to learn.

Focus work in a way that is appealing to the type of people that you would want to work for, focus on the client and working with the client, the work shouldn’t all be about yourself and more about the needs of the client.

The importance of empathy with the client and with the cause, this can be frustrating or others might see it as taking you off the course but its finding a solution and a communication to understand. There is more fulfilment in finding solutions, that also might look good. But the solution is most important.

If you satisfy the client but don’t reach the audience it isn’t a solution, depending on the client.

Always looking to take the next step, looking to better the design and skills and solving problems for people.

After life 22nd January 2019

Bwtic – Paul Thomas

Failure can be a beginning not an end.

Think about how people are going to receive the things you send them. PDF portfolio.

If you can join a studio after you graduate, it’s a good place to learn and develop as a designer. It gives you a place where you can make mistakes and learn from them.

Freelancing in studios, lets you work with lots of different people and different projects.

National Theatre Wales –

Produce site specific theatre. Applied to be the artist in residence, slowly started to work with them, building working relationships with clients so you work with them not just for them.

Working on the rebrand of the National Theatre Wales. Takes months of research, workshops, interviews – need to know what the brand is about.

Bwtic

Less talk – more listen

Less know – more learn

Less distance – more understanding

Less for – more with

Less ego – more empathy.

Compete with yourself and your previous work not just with others and what you have seen elsewhere.

Whilst freelancing you have to have confidence and be able to be on your toes and confident in your ideas. There seems to be more pressure whilst freelancing. This is why it might be better to start out in a studios. Higher pressure whilst freelancing. There is a lot of other distractions whist working freelance that you have to think about other than just the design work.

When contacting design companies

Remember they are very busy, people will try and get back to you. Be concise with your portfolio and what you send out to people, make it easy for them. Show interest in the company and the individual – I there any connections. Show what you can offer them – what you can bring to them.

Work experience – they help you get a feel for the studio culture. Ideal to try and get experience, without this enthusiasm and work ethic showing your willing to learn.

Focus work in a way that is appealing to the type of people that you would want to work for, focus on the client and working with the client, the work shouldn’t all be about yourself and more about the needs of the client.

The importance of empathy with the client and with the cause, this can be frustrating or others might see it as taking you off the course but its finding a solution and a communication to understand. There is more fulfilment in finding solutions, that also might look good. But the solution is most important.

If you satisfy the client but don’t reach the audience it isn’t a solution, depending on the client.

Always looking to take the next step, looking to better the design and skills and solving problems for people.