After Modernism

Pop art and consumerism.

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Discussion about the idea of Alloway’s “taste pyramid” with the most tasteless reproducible things with most support at the bottom and the ‘one of a kind’ things at the top with the least support.

Warhol’s “192 Dollar Bills” sold for $43,800,000 – is this work a criticism of consumerism or not.

Bill Drummond bought Richard Long’s “A Smell of Sulphur in the Wind” for $20,00 and proceeded to split it p into 20,000 pieces and sell each square for $1 – showing that the value of a painting is not given this way – similar to Warhol’s dollars the actual value is not the value.

Art has little USE VALUE (you can’t use it to do things it has no useable purpose) but it has high EXCHANGE VALUE in that people pay lots for it because it brings them a sense of power.

Food and consumption in Pop Art –

Food in pop art is shown in an industrially produced, templated and isolated way in that they aren’t surrounded by the theatrics of traditional still life scenes of banqueting tables. It’s standardised and depersonalised and interchangeable.

Gender in Pop art

Women are domestic, often shown as or in the context of domestic scene or domestic appliances. In Richard Hamilton’s “$he” the fragmented woman is made up of shapes and hints of the female form, with aspects mimicking Duchamp’s “Large Glass” the failings of the male organ with the stream of dots failing to reach its target.

Men are seen as masculine and there’s lots of car imagery used in many artist’s pieces of work.

We were shown the work of Rosalyn Dexter which I found really interesting.

Pop art and consumerism

Discussion about the idea of Alloway’s “taste pyramid” with the most tasteless reproducible things with most support at the bottom and the ‘one of a kind’ things at the top with the least support.

Warhol’s “192 Dollar Bills” sold for $43,800,000 – is this work a criticism of consumerism or not.

Bill Drummond bought Richard Long’s “A Smell of Sulphur in the Wind” for $20,00 and proceeded to split it p into 20,000 pieces and sell each square for $1 – showing that the value of a painting is not given this way – similar to Warhol’s dollars the actual value is not the value.

Art has little USE VALUE (you can’t use it to do things it has no useable purpose) but it has high EXCHANGE VALUE in that people pay lots for it because it brings them a sense of power.

Food and consumption in Pop Art –

Food in pop art is shown in an industrially produced, templated and isolated way in that they aren’t surrounded by the theatrics of traditional still life scenes of banqueting tables. It’s standardised and depersonalised and interchangeable.

Gender in Pop art

Women are domestic, often shown as or in the context of domestic scene or domestic appliances. In Richard Hamilton’s “$he” the fragmented woman is made up of shapes and hints of the female form, with aspects mimicking Duchamp’s “Large Glass” the failings of the male organ with the stream of dots failing to reach its target.

Men are seen as masculine and there’s lots of car imagery used in many artist’s pieces of work.

We were shown the work of Rosalyn Dexter which I found really interesting.

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